Bollettino D'arte (2012). Il Medagliere Del Palazzo Reale Di Torino - Aa.Vv. | Libro De Luca Editori D'arte 11/2014 - HOEPLI.it


home libri books ebook dvd e film top ten sconti 0 Carrello


Torna Indietro

aa.vv. - bollettino d'arte (2012). il medagliere del palazzo reale di torino

BOLLETTINO D'ARTE (2012). IL MEDAGLIERE DEL PALAZZO REALE DI TORINO STORIA E RESTAURO DELLA SALA E DELLE COLLEZIONI




Disponibilità: Normalmente disponibile in 5 giorni


PREZZO
84,00 €
NICEPRICE
71,40 €
SCONTO
15%



Questo prodotto usufruisce delle SPEDIZIONI GRATIS
selezionando l'opzione Corriere Veloce in fase di ordine.


Pagabile anche con App18 Bonus Cultura e Carta Docenti


Facebook Twitter Aggiungi commento


Spese Gratis

Dettagli

Genere:Libro
Lingua: Italiano
Pubblicazione: 11/2014





Note Libraio

The Royal Medagliere is a small sumptuously decorated room in the Royal Palace in Turin. It lies between the actual palace and the frescoed gallery painted by Claudio Francesco Beaumont and was destined to become the Royal Armoury by King Carlo Alberto of Savoy Carignano. This same name is also applied to Carlo Alberto’s collection of coins, medals and seals for which the room was in fact designed. The Volume presented here, a result of the combined effort of many and coordinated by Alessandra Guerrini, Director of the Royal Armoury, tells the story of the development and construction from 1835 to 1838 of a singular and homogeneous project that was the king’s strongest desire. The success of this project may be due to the particular attention it received from the court architect Pelagio Palagi, who, a coin collector himself, was directly interested in the subject matter. In placing the three institutions – Library, Armoury and Coin Collection – in a separate outer wing of the palace, Carlo Alberto was trying to create new cultural institutions in Italy based on the French model, both as a structure for study and as an illustration of the history of the kingdom, which he already considered that of a unified Italy. The planning of the Medagliere (the Cabinet of Medals according to its historical name) ends with the death of Carlo Alberto, as does the growth of the collection, which had reached a notable 28,600 coins, some 3,200 medals, plaques and military decorations, and more than 1,400 seals. From the end of the nineteenth century, the room was progressively forgotten. In 1958 the collections became part of the Medagliere Civico, and in 1977 the cabinets were put in storage and the room destined to accommodate an expansion of the Armoury. Research into different aspects of the Medagliere’s history was carried out in tandem with the restoration begun in 1992 and financed entirely by the Ministry of Culture. The original appearance of the room which had been much altered during the 20th century has now been res The Royal Medagliere is a small sumptuously decorated room in the Royal Palace in Turin. It lies between the actual palace and the frescoed gallery painted by Claudio Francesco Beaumont and was destined to become the Royal Armoury by King Carlo Alberto of Savoy Carignano. This same name is also applied to Carlo Alberto’s collection of coins, medals and seals for which the room was in fact designed. The Volume presented here, a result of the combined effort of many and coordinated by Alessandra Guerrini, Director of the Royal Armoury, tells the story of the development and construction from 1835 to 1838 of a singular and homogeneous project that was the king’s strongest desire. The success of this project may be due to the particular attention it received from the court architect Pelagio Palagi, who, a coin collector himself, was directly interested in the subject matter. In placing the three institutions – Library, Armoury and Coin Collection – in a separate outer wing of the palace, Carlo Alberto was trying to create new cultural institutions in Italy based on the French model, both as a structure for study and as an illustration of the history of the kingdom, which he already considered that of a unified Italy. The planning of the Medagliere (the Cabinet of Medals according to its historical name) ends with the death of Carlo Alberto, as does the growth of the collection, which had reached a notable 28,600 coins, some 3,200 medals, plaques and military decorations, and more than 1,400 seals. From the end of the nineteenth century, the room was progressively forgotten. In 1958 the collections became part of the Medagliere Civico, and in 1977 the cabinets were put in storage and the room destined to accommodate an expansion of the Armoury. Research into different aspects of the Medagliere’s history was carried out in tandem with the restoration begun in 1992 and financed entirely by the Ministry of Culture. The original appearance of the room which had been much altered during the 20th century has now been res The Royal Medagliere is a small sumptuously decorated room in the Royal Palace in Turin. It lies between the actual palace and the frescoed gallery painted by Claudio Francesco Beaumont and was destined to become the Royal Armoury by King Carlo Alberto of Savoy Carignano. This same name is also applied to Carlo Alberto’s collection of coins, medals and seals for which the room was in fact designed. The Volume presented here, a result of the combined effort of many and coordinated by Alessandra Guerrini, Director of the Royal Armoury, tells the story of the development and construction from 1835 to 1838 of a singular and homogeneous project that was the king’s strongest desire. The success of this project may be due to the particular attention it received from the court architect Pelagio Palagi, who, a coin collector himself, was directly interested in the subject matter. In placing the three institutions – Library, Armoury and Coin Collection – in a separate outer wing of the palace, Carlo Alberto was trying to create new cultural institutions in Italy based on the French model, both as a structure for study and as an illustration of the history of the kingdom, which he already considered that of a unified Italy. The planning of the Medagliere (the Cabinet of Medals according to its historical name) ends with the death of Carlo Alberto, as does the growth of the collection, which had reached a notable 28,600 coins, some 3,200 medals, plaques and military decorations, and more than 1,400 seals. From the end of the nineteenth century, the room was progressively forgotten. In 1958 the collections became part of the Medagliere Civico, and in 1977 the cabinets were put in storage and the room destined to accommodate an expansion of the Armoury. Research into different aspects of the Medagliere’s history was carried out in tandem with the restoration begun in 1992 and financed entirely by the Ministry of Culture. The original appearance of the room which had been much altered during the 20th century has now been res







Altre Informazioni

ISBN:

9788865571781

Condizione: Nuovo
Formato: Brossura
Pagine Arabe: 278






Utilizziamo i cookie di profilazione, anche di terze parti, per migliorare la navigazione, per fornire servizi e proporti pubblicità in linea con le tue preferenze. Se vuoi saperne di più o negare il consenso a tutti o ad alcuni cookie clicca qui. Chiudendo questo banner o proseguendo nella navigazione acconsenti all’uso dei cookie.

X